Balboa Park Detour, San Diego

Image

Blog 4:

The drive into Balboa Park is a winding one – tree-lined with perfect grass fields beyond. Everything is calculated, from the snake-like road to the even spacing between the trees. The sprawling landscape goes as far as you can see in some directions, with views across the city to the ocean. Once parked, we mistakenly came across a raised landform topped with an immaculately constructed park. From afar, one can only see the archways and delicately carved railing surrounding the space. The fencing circles the entire park area, with evenly placed Roman-looking doorways forming a geometric shape. Within the path, there are smaller paths surrounded by pristine grass, they lead toward the center of the park. The area looks like a spiderweb, made up of zones and shapes. Walking to the middle, I was awestruck by the precision with which the sections of the park were placed together. They were like a perfectly grafted puzzle, gripping to the other pieces at the edges.

Approaching the center of the common, I could see only a circle of tall, thin, and piney trees. They formed a flawless sphere around a mystery centerpiece. Upon growing closer to the center, I was able to make out a fountain amidst the trees. People sat on and around the fountain, eating in silence, quietly relaxing, or even meditating.  Walking into the enclosed circle is like entering a new space, yet still full of the same shapes, lines, and flawlessness. The water created the light sounds of rainfall, while the sun shone in great beams all around me.  The aura was not one for noise or speed, this segment of Balboa park was conducive only to soft whispers and slow meandering. I passed beyond the center fountain across to the other side. I walked under a trellis, matching the one parallel to it, on the other side of the enclosed space. Walking away, I turned and looked back, noting the linear and arithmetical vision laid out in front of me. Who knew such fierce lines and geometric shapes could create such a place of calm and quiet?

Blog 3 (revised):

It was about time I took a trip out of Los Angeles, needing to experience a bit of “absence makes the heart grow fonder.”  With excitement and wonder we drove down the coast, stopping to gaze at and photograph the ocean, playing the role of “tourist” perfectly. We visited some beautiful sites on the first day in La Jolla – especially The Salk Institute and The Museum of Contemporary Art. Though only a couple hours from home, it felt like were a world away. The seaside, laid-back vibe of La Jolla is so far-removed from the fast pace of Los Angeles, it was a welcomed break.

The second day we ventured into San Diego itself, stopping downtown in Little Italy for art supplies. Military jets roared through the skies as the ocean quivered and glimmered under the sunbeams, we were filled with unending excitement. We were headed to the Japanese Garden at Balboa Park, but Apple Maps took us to the opposite side of the park, amidst construction and a military base. We parked and began to walk to where the blue dot on the phone indicated the garden was. Little did we know, we were far off-course. We arrived at the “garden” only to find an unfinished construction site. We kept walking and came across some military men who kindly pointed us back to where we came from, feeling sorry for our lack of direction. We took a different route back toward the car, continuing to believe the garden would be around the next bend or over the next hill… it was not. But in our adventure we came across the park’s many other stunning sites. There was a view of the city and the park, all at once. There was a seamless geometric garden with brilliant and ornate archways, paths, fencing, and paving. Balboa Park has innumerable hidden gems, even the construction areas are a beautiful work in progress.

We eventually made it to the REAL Japanese Garden. It was an exquisite sight to behold, and it was incredible to see the development of such an intricate landscape. By getting lost we were able to discover some of San Diego’s and Balboa Park’s marvels. Like I always say, everything happens for a reason. Apple Maps – thank you for the detour.

Blog 3 (original):

I had not been to the San Diego area since my road trip down the coast of California five years ago. It was about time I took a trip out of Los Angeles, needing to experience a bit of “absence makes the heart grow fonder.”  With excitement and wonder we drove, stopping to look at the ocean, playing the role of “tourist” perfectly. We visited some beautiful sites on the first day in La Jolla – especially The Salk Institute and The Museum of Contemporary Art. The second day we ventured into San Diego itself, stopping downtown in Little Italy for art supplies. Military jets roared through the skies as the ocean quivered and glimmered under the sunbeams. Filled with unending excitement, we were headed to the Japanese Garden at Balboa Park. Unfortunately, Apple Maps took us to the opposite side of the park, amidst construction and a military base. We parked and began to walk to where the dot on the phone indicated the garden was. Little did we know, we were far off-course. We arrived at the “garden” only to find an unfinished construction site. We kept walking and came across some military men who kindly pointed us back to where we came from, feeling sorry for our lack of direction. We took a different route back toward the car, continuing to believe the garden would be around the next bend or over the next hill… it was not. But in our adventure we came across the park’s many other stunning sites. There was a view of the city and the park, all at once. There was a seamless geometric garden with brilliant and ornate archways, paths, fencing, and paving. Balboa Park has innumerable hidden gems, even the construction areas are a beautiful work in progress. We eventually made it to the REAL Japanese Garden, just in time for the end of lecture. The Japanese Garden was exquisite, and it was incredible to see the development of such an intricate landscape. Sadly, we missed some valuable information during the presentation, which was the sacrifice we were forced to make for discovering some of San Diego’s and Balboa Park’s marvels. Like I always say, everything happens for a reason. Apple Maps – thank you for the detour.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s