the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego

UTI1599796_t940

Blog #4

During my visit to San Diego, the word ‘inspiration’ hit my mind. Of all the places we saw, the one place that stood out to me the most was my visit to the Museum of Contemporary Arts. There was an installation that made me speechless. It was the masterpiece, 1° 2° 3° 4° Four dimensions, by Robert Irwin. The installation called for four air proof walls and within those walls are three windows. The design has a way of incorporating the open outdoor atmosphere into the enclosed indoor area.

Windows are split in three rectangles and show the gallery’s wide ocean view, framing the details of the beautiful vista. The winds blowing in from outside also made it feel as if the person was out there. By framing the parts of an ocean view with open rectangles, the gallery challenge the eyes as they frame details of the postcard-perfect scene. Irwin tried to indicate that art and nature are infinitely one.

The breathtaking ocean view of the three windows shows height, width, depth and time. It exemplifies the illusionism through manipulation of light and space or depth, along with real salt-air breezes wafting in from outdoors. The outdoor area viewed had enchanting plants, a huge sculpture made of canoes, and the ocean on one side. This area itself could be considered as an outdoor gallery that has no traditional walls. This gallery was very unique compare to regular art galleries.

The windows are not hedged in with rules and regulations of traditional galleries. What i think Irwin was trying to show the window caught my attention and allowed me to focus even more than other arts. It seemed like a tangible object, but in fact it was not. Irwin implied auditory—hearing the sound from the La Jolla Ocean, visual—seeing the whole view from the frame window, and smell- smelling the ocean. It incorporated both the nature and construction to create a piece of an art.

 Blog# 3

On the first day of the field trip in San Diego. We went to the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, it is an art museum focused on the collection, preservation, exhibition, and interpretation of works of art. The one impressed me most is called 1° 2° 3° 4°: Four dimensions, one masterpiece. This is the one part of Krichman Family Gallery. The artist called Robert Irwin, there are three rectangles cut in the tinted windows of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego’s ocean view gallery, framing details of the beautiful vista. By framing parts of an ocean view with open rectangles, which challenge the eye as they frame details of the postcard-perfect scene. You’re first aware of the difference in color, then the breeze wafts through the lighter blue openings, suddenly, people of all ages are delighted to discover the playful high jinks underlying a profound message: art and nature are infinitely one. He conceived this installation for the museum’s breathtaking ocean view gallery. The title, “1° 2° 3° 4°,” refers to the three dimensions — height, width, depth — plus a fourth: time. It exemplifies the movement’s illusionism through manipulated light and space or depth, in this case surprisingly conveyed by real salt-air breezes wafting in from outdoors. This design it is the first one makes me feel more and more comfortable and relaxation. When you face to this window, they are not hedged in with rules and regulations. And it also can let you pay more attention on this design. It such like the thing you can touch, but not really can touch it. This design includes auditory—hear the sound from the La Jolla Ocean, visual—see the whole view from the frame window, and smell- smell the ocean. This experience is the one I will never forget.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s