UCSD

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Blog #4

The day began full of anticipation as i knew i was headed down to San Diego to go take a tour of the Stuart collection at UCSD.  We walked around and saw some of the pieces throughout the campus, and what caught my attention was that the pieces seemed to have certain things in common.  Some of the pieces were very angular, some were colorful, and some were abstract.  The pieces that caught my attention the most were the colorful ones.  The Sun God, Fallen Star, and Read/Write/Think/Dream all fall under this category.  They all play with light properties to capture your attention.  Colored tiles, colorfully decorated interior, creation of colors by overlapping primary colors, they each had a unique way of using color to interact with the audience.  The pieces that i would include as angular would be Untitled, Two Running Violet V Forms, and Another.  To me, these pieces had important lines running through the designs that caught your eye.   With Untitled, it was the symmetry of the fountain with the flagpole and how they were aligned.  With the running V Forms, the way the fence ran throughout the trees at distinct angles, and the contrast it created with those sharp lines was fascinating.  The abstract pieces would have to be Trees, Bear, and Snake Path.  These were some of the more interactive and interesting pieces on the tour.  These used large stones, mosaic tiles, and lead sheets placed over tree trunks to get you to walk up to them and interact with them.  Each one had its own textures and gradients that made them unique in this category.  It was great to see the pieces that we had time for, and it was also good to understand the significance of each one and how they each have their own little hideaways on the UCSD campus.

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Blog #3

The day began with the scenic drive along the coast down to San Diego.    Once you pass San Clemente along the 5 freeway, your met with the ocean as you continue down closer to the city.  We all met at UCSD to take a tour of the campus, which was home to the Stuart Collection.  The first thing I noticed was the scream of fighter jets in the skies above as they departed Miramar.  The UCSD students all seemed unfazed by the loud roars of the jet engines, as they are accustomed to this on a daily basis.  We walked all around campus and briefly stopped at each one of the pieces in the collection, and our tour guide spoke to us about the significance of each piece and its relevance to their individual locations.  The ones that caught my attention were Trees, Fallen Star, and Snake Path.  Our tour guide had us stare off into the distance to see if we could spot one of the Trees from Terry Allen’s piece, and some from our group were able to distinguish the artificial tree from the rest.  As we walked up to it, you could see the texture of the lead sheets as they were nailed on the trunk, and you could hear the music that the tree plays from within.  We headed to the snake path, and started off at the head of the serpent, and followed the path down to the tail.  The texture that was created from the tiles, and the curvature of the path made it feel like we were walking on a 3D form.  As we walked down the path we could see Fallen Star sitting on the edge of a building up ahead.  This piece is very hard to miss because its not everyday that you see a house protruding from the edge of a building like that.  When we reached the roof to enter, we were met with a full on yard complete with landscaping and various plants along the edges.  When you enter the house, you can feel a bit disoriented because of the slope of the floor and the visual cues that have that effect on the visitors.  Overall the experience was great.

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