Blog #3 & #4

IMG_2567Blog #4

I woke up, got ready, and departed into the heavy morning dew of Oceanside. I was reminded of last year when I’d be going to work in a timely fashion. Time was always important, and will always be.  Today I had the privilege to tour the famous Salk institute in La Jolla.

The morning went quite pleasant with a mimosa and eggs Benedict to start off my day. Having extra time to enjoy a breakfast is special to me. A bright shining sun reminded me that mid-day was approaching and the others will be gathering at the Salk Institute to spend some time visiting the campus and discussing the building and design process.

Time is a valuable property that must be considered when designing an outdoor space, building, or anything that will be exposed to the elements. Wind, water, and sunlight all contribute to the aging of materials and the appearance they give off. Aged materials are a direct representation of time. We can utilize the appearance of such materials like a clock, which tells how long a building has been standing, how often it is maintained, or when the last time these materials had been replaced.

The time we spent at the Salk Institute, which was roughly two or three hours, made me realize that I can measure the amount of time that the institute has been here by examining the teak wood panels around the windows. This campus was built with the intent to have no maintenance and to embrace time. The ocean and salty air with its destructive properties aged the wood so clearly which expressed the fact that time had its effect on this building.

After our time at the Salk Institute we left to grab some lunch. My experience there had me reflecting on the fact that time is everything, it’s everywhere and its reflection can be very apparent. Time is what we slave to everyday, it’s what we consider when working on designs or drawings, and without it our lives would be completely unstructured and most likely disastrous. It’s best to be aware time; however the key is to not let it overcome you. Manage your time well and time will be on your side.

Blog #3 Revised

With one faint cloud above me, the Salk Institute unraveled much more than a view to the ocean. This biological study center was designed for minimal maintenance so it will last long for many generations- just like the scientific research conducted here could create a cure for the generations to come. The light, wind, and water elements were enclosed in the grand courtyard all around this axial and metaphorical stream. This stream in the center of the courtyard was flowing from one end to the other and it represented the collaboration of minds all working together. Without enough water the stream wouldn’t be flowing and without the brilliant minds at the Salk Institute cures to the planets common diseases wouldn’t develop.

The design draws your eye to the end of the stream where your view is then framed on the horizon of the pacific. As I was guided through the space, I was informed on the process in which this architecturally magnificent campus was built. Volcanic ash was mixed into the concrete walls and the matching travertine marble floor gave off a warm emotion. These walls were constructed horizontally on the ground and were tilted up vertical to create the six-story towers on either side of the stream. A close examination revealed an unfinished look where I saw the structural steel in the concrete walls and the wood grain imprint from the set-forms on the volcanic surface. In my opinion the color of materials chosen here demonstrates strength and unity. I see strength because the colors are similar to that of solid granite or sedimentary parent material, and I see unity because of the similar neutrality in the colors ties everything together to make a great design.

Louis Kahn’s Salk Institute was very inspirational to me and I hope one day I can reflect some of his design process in my future endeavors.

Blog #3 Original:

With one faint cloud above me, the royal blue sky blended together as one with the sparkling blue ocean. The Salk institute created a prestigious emotion within me. The light, wind, and water elements were enclosed in the grand courtyard all around this axial and metaphorical stream. This stream in the center of the courtyard was flowing from one end to the other and it represented the collaboration of minds all working together. Without enough water the stream wouldn’t be flowing and without the brilliant minds at the Salk Institute cures to the planets common diseases wouldn’t develop. The design layout draws your eye to the end of the stream where your view is framed to the pacific. Knowing that cutting edge research is conducted behind these ashy walls, it made me feel as if I was part of something important. As I walked through the space, I was educated on the process in which this architecturally magnificent campus was built. Volcanic ash was mixed into the concrete walls and the matching travertine marble floor gave off a warm emotion. Although as I stood in the majestic courtyard the wind blew through as if I was in a tunnel and left me quite cold. These walls were constructed horizontally on the ground and were tilted up vertical to create the six-story towers on either side of me. A view close up revealed an unfinished look where I saw the structural steel in the concrete walls and the wood grain imprint from the set-forms on the volcanic surface. The Salk Institute unraveled more than a view to the ocean. This biological study center was designed for minimal maintenance so it will last long for many generations, just like the scientific research conducted here could create a cure for the generations to come. The stream will keep flowing and the Salk Institute will continue to amaze. One day I will design like Louis Kahn.

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