Blog #3 LACMA

LACMA
Blog #4:
A sunny day where kids were laughing, playing on a green grassy surface. The smell of a freshly cut grass was in the air. The kids wearing the same uniform, a white polo with navy blue pants. On one side of the hill where kids and grown ups alike would roll down the hill there was this foul stench coming from. Following the foul odor through a gravel dirt pathway, at the end was a pool. This wasn’t an ordinary pool, the water was black, gooey, bubbling and had this harsh smell. On the end of the pool there was a family of mammoths. One was drowning in this gooey stuff. I was a second grader at the time in elementary school.
This is what I felt as soon as I saw those mammoths again in there, learning a lot about the tar and fossils coming out of the black pool.

This time around after spending a brief short of time by the pits I decided to explore around. There were many pathways leading to several places. I stood to one and started walking on the dirt road. To the horizon at the end of the pathway was something orange reddish that caught my eye. It was hiding behind a wall of small triangular, oval shaped leaves that had veins running through them and growing from the ground. It was also surrounded by towers that on top looked like a green afro. As I got closer this orange object got bigger and hollow. It was a cylindrical a shape with a 60 degree angle cut at each end. Each cylinder was stacked up on top of each other to from pyramid form. This installation was the Pheonix Installation by Alexander Liberman.

Revised:
On Saturday gloomy morning a friend and I decided to head to LACMA. The sky was so grayed out, it looked like a blanket was covering us from the sunlight. I’ve been to LACMA a couple of times so I knew it was a great place to go to and look at the art exhibits. This time around instead of going inside the museum, I toured the outside, in Hancock Park. I’ve never really toured outside so I decided to look at the installations in the landscape.

I saw that the the La Brea Tar Pits was in the park which I didn’t know. As soon as I saw them I felt a little nostalgic. Had a little flashback when I was in 1st grade on a field trip to those pits where I thought that it was awesome that people were digging up fossils from extinct animals. It felt like if it was yesterday when I was in my uniform, walking around the pit and looking at the mammoths inside the tar pit. Smelling that horrible odor, seeing the lake black and bubbling made me want to go back to the care free days.

After staring at the pits and reminicing for a while i deciced to follow this gravel dirt path. I wanted to find out where it led to, and what holded at the end of this walkway. As I was walking I smelled the fresh cut grass and tar, heard cars driving in the nearby stree, kids playing on the hill and dogs barking. As I reached the end I saw this orange hollowed cylinders cut diagnolly at its edges. Each one stacked up on each other making a form of a pyramid. This Installation was Alexander Liberman’s Pheonix Installation. This was definelty worth not going inside LACMA and paying for a ticket.

During the 4th week of winter quarter there was a scheduled field trip to San Diego and visit museums. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to go to and experience San Diego which I have never been there. So I had to do an alternate assignment here in Los Angeles. On Saturday morning my friend and I decided to head to LACMA.  I’ve been to LACMA before so I knew it was a great place to go to and look at the installations. This time around instead of going inside the museum, I toured the outside, in Hancock Park. To my surprise I saw that the La Brea Tar Pits was in the park which I didn’t know. As soon as I saw the pits I felt a little nostalgic. Had a little flashback when I was in 1st grade on a field trip to those pits where I thought that it was awesome that people were digging up bones from extinct animals. It felt like if it was yesterday when I was in my uniform walking around the pit and looking at the mammoths inside the tar pit. It made me miss being small again and going to a lot of field trips. I also remembered that this black gooey stuff, which is the tar, was coming up and into the park so they had a lot of tape and signs warning the people to stay out of or not touch. This time there was hardly any so people were playing in the park. Although my visit to the LACMA was to do a Figure Ground Study, which I did and also learned more about the installations outside the museum it was awesome that I saw the  pits cause it reminded me about the first time being there as a kid in 1st grade.  

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