Tijuana Estuarine Narrative

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#4

From my experience on Tijuana River National Estuarine I learned that being in a real scene is a whole lot different than looking at an image of a scene. I felt intimidated not only by the giant fence, built to keep me in or out, but the police as well because of their constant presence. Overall, the trip to the estuarine was a great one time experience.

In order to enter the beach, I had to follow a winding concrete and dirt path. The only way I was able to tell whether we reached the beach was by the changing texture of the ground. Sands started to crunch under me feet as I got closer and the sound of wildly blowing wind and waves crashed around me. I felt relaxed and the only thing I wanted to do was to sit and calmly look at the horizon while the flocks of birds were flying and chasing waves.

As the class moved towards the fence, I noticed the tall height and length of the fence. The long narrow lines were as tall as a 2 or 3 story building. It looked impossible to climb and the fence formed a line, a form of division, between Mexico and the U.S. I felt like I was being caged in and constantly being watched or spied on, but by just facing away from the fence and towards the ocean, a sensation of being free and open rushed over me. It’s amazing how looking at two different direction could give two very different sensations.

Tijuana River National Estuarine is place where one can sense different views at the same time. Not only do I experience the physical form of the land change drastically I felt the change in environment and atmosphere. It was interesting how there were buildings on the Mexico side of the fence and on the U,S, side was just the hill, ocean, and sand.

#3

Tijuana river national estuarine is an area of physical and cultural separation of The U.S. and Mexico. This was one of the sites that impacted me the most. At first the site meant nothing until I met the final path, the border of U.S., that I experienced the strength and restriction a space can hold.

On my arrival to Tijuana River National Estuarine, the beach was nowhere in sight and all around me  were rocky dirt roads and parking lot, trees, shrubs, grass, metal fence, etc. The area was open and flat and everyone was waiting for the trip to the estuarine to begin. Surprisingly, a worker there warned us about contaminated water/ mud that flowed down from Tijuana, explaining how toxic some areas were and what harms might come to us if we were not careful.

Every careful step was leading me closer to the beach. It was really interesting how the dirt road or path drastically changed into sand in just a few steps. As soon as the view of the ocean was visible to my eyes, I couldn’t look away. The sky was clear, the waves were strong, the cool blowing winds, and the soft sand added texture to the scene. Although it wasn’t comfortable to walk across and litters were everywhere, just the view of the ocean was enjoyable.

The walk continued on until the fence, the barrier, was in front of me and everyone. An attempt to touch the fence was impossible since the policemen drove down just to warn us not to. It scared me a bit and I even felt the policemen watch from above, on a hilltop, watching our every move. Lots of pictures were taken and lots of topics were discussed and at the end we walked back.

On my path back to the parking lot I noticed a river that was flowing right through the path to the parking lot. I am assuming the channel of water flowed down from Tijuana, Mexico to San Diego, U.S. It’s just amazing how nature has no boundary while people always bind and divide ourselves with rules, laws, morals, culture, religion, etc.

#3

Tijuana river national estuarine is an area of physical and cultural separation of The U.S. and Mexico by political and physical force. This was one of sites that impacted me the most. The landscape emitted an atmosphere of oppression, power, fear, and irony. At first the site meant nothing until I met the final path, the end of U.S., that I experienced the strength that a space can hold.

On my arrival to Tijuana River National Estuarine, the beach was nowhere in sight and all around me were rocky dirt roads and parking lot, trees, shrubs, grass, metal fence, etc. The area was open and flat and everyone was waiting for the trip to the estuarine to begin. Surprisingly, a worker there warned us about contaminated water/ mud that flowed down from Tijuana, making my expectation to lessen.

Every step was leading me closer to the beach. It was really interesting how the dirt road or path drastically changed into sand in just a few steps. As soon as the view of the ocean was visible to my eyes, I couldn’t look away. The sky was clear, the waves were strong, the cool blowing winds, and the soft sand added texture to the scene.

The walk continued on until the fence, the barrier, was in front of me and everyone. An attempt to touch the fence was impossible since the policemen drove down just to warn us not to. It scared me a bit and I even felt the policemen watch from above, on a hilltop, watching our every move. Lots of pictures were taken and lots of topics were discussed and at the end we walked back.

On my path back to the parking lot I noticed a river that was flowing right through the path. I am assuming the channel of water flowed down from Tijuana, Mexico to San Diego, U.S. It’s just amazing how mature has no boundary.

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