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Monthly Archives: January 2014

Here are some JPEG’s of the CAD design I’ve drawn up.  The questions I posted in my previous post still need to be answered, i.e. rail material and section cut materials.  I’ve priced out a couple different options to look at.

I didn’t clearly explain in my last post that this design eliminates the need for creating notches (over 2000), and instead puts notches into the section cuts, allowing everyone to slip their individual pieces onto the rails and making them almost disappear into the model.  I hope these JPEG’s illustrate this clearly.  This method would greatly minimize our work and emphasize the section cuts instead of the model base.

P.S. I’ve designed the wire hangers to go directly through the rail itself (drilled hole), eliminating any lateral torque.

River Plan ViewPLAN VIEW OF GALLERY

River ElevationMODEL ELEVATION, HANGING FROM CEILING

River Elevation DetailELEVATION DETAIL, 1/8″ SECTION CUTS WITH 1/2″ SPACING – 24 SECTION CUTS PER PERSON

Wire DetailWIRE DETAIL, NOTICE RAIL DISAPPEARS INTO SECTION CUT

Section ASECTION A-A’

Section BSECTION B-B’

 

Here is my idea which is a blend of all of the good ideas we’ve had so far. This is the simplest approach I can think of that will be extremely effective.

The model base would be made of MDF board (same material Ernie used for his LA 103 model) at 2′ 6″ wide for a seamless and sturdy sleeve for the laser cut “ribs” (cardboard or basswood) to slide in. This will create a unity to the piece and make the river feel as if it has a base holding it up.

The model will be suspended from the ceiling and held up by these pieces of wood that I can get very easily from the home depot. They are used to hold lumber off the ground so the forks of a forklift can fit under, they already have the grooves cut out to hold hanging line in place.

Depending on the amount of detail we intend to have on the top of the model itself, I don’t think we need to create any kind of step for people to see higher parts of the river, by standing adjacent and back a little, one will still be able to view these parts of the river.

Also, disregard diagonal lines running across model base.

billys mock up 2billys mock up_wire detailbillys mock up_view of topbillys mock up_look down

Model Idea_sketch

CAD File to follow later, but hopefully this explains the concept clearly enough for now.  Questions include rail material type (i.e. steel, aluminum?), individual section cut material (basswood, balsa, chipboard?), and hanging materials?

Also let’s look at how to effectively use Chad’s idea of adding images of some type (drawings, photographs, narratives?…), to the sides of the model (perhaps hanging), that match up with each person’s designated mile?

One more consideration is how to deal with the many tributaries that flow into the L.A. River?  If people model the openings it will effect the way they hang on the rails… hmmm