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CicLAvia was an event that was held on April 21, 2013 in downtown Los Angeles. The route consisted of a 15 mile stretch that connected downtown Los Angeles to the beach. The event was mostly composed of bike riders, but there were occasional non-bikers on the route. Much of the route was isolated from cars and was open to pedestrians. With the closure of the streets one can actually experience Los Angeles in a new way that does not consist of being inside of a car.

The first thing that you notice when cars are not on the street is the size of the streets. A four to five lane road occupies much more space then sidewalks or even retail outside space. This clearly illustrates that the automobile has great importance in our society. Another thing to consider is how fast the city ends and where the neighborhoods start. The beginning of the route begins with huge skyscrapers within 7 miles you begin to notice less city life and more residential areas. One of the most striking and revealing features that comes into focus when you’re riding your bike toward the ocean; are the many slopes and hills that the city roads traverse.

The streets are for the most part easy to moderate to handle when you go downhill towards the ocean, the same can’t be said when returning to downtown. That is when you actually begin to experience the actual topography of Los Angeles. Much of the bike riders did not make it back to downtown once they reached the ocean. I believe that this is partly due to the lack of training and conditioning needed to complete a thirty mile run. The time limit set by the event was the biggest downfall, what would make this event better would be to extend the time limit; by extending it one can have the opportunity to explore with more detail.

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IMG_32423Photo of Lawrence Halprin with the Ira keller fountain in the background

Lawrence Halprin was a well-known landscape architect that was based from San Francisco; Halprin got much of this inspiration from nature and sounds. He is known for creating many spaces that are open to the public, spaces that invite people to interact and be part of the overall landscape experience. For example, the Ira Keller Fountain is a space that not only is a sculpture piece, but is also a place where people can come and play in the water. The fountain was a product of an urban renewal movement within the city of Portland. The fountain was created in order to highlight Portland’s theme of a “city within a city,” this project is important because it is a fountain that doesn’t have to be solely for viewing, but was designed for interaction. This new way of seeing public space as an interaction piece is what made Lawrence Halprin famous. Much of this inspiration comes from nature that is abstracted with a geometric naturalism; the design seen in this fountain is based off the high sierras spring cascades. Lawrence Halprin saw this space as a plaza that had theatre sets that were choreographed by human movement, the movement of water is to symbolize the action of people with a given space.

L´Escalier d´Eau

Association Lausanne Jardins Sevelin Lausanne, Switzerland 2004 Image Taken by Sebastien Secchi Source: Contemporary Landscape Architecture (DAAB) Water is associated with movement; the design here is to focus on water that is stationary.

Diwang Urban Park II

UPLOADED BY JAIME FLORES

Shenzhen Planning & Land Resources Bureau Shenzhen, China 2005 Image taken by Yan Meng, Jiu Chen Source: Contemporary Landscape Architecture (DAAB) The park has features related to the city, lines and forms reflect the movement of urban cities.

Punta Pite

UPLOADED BY JAIME FLORES

Estudio Del Paisaje Teresa Moller and Associates Zapallar,Chile 2005 Image taken by Cristobal Palma Source: Contemporary Landscape Architecture (DAAB) A ledge of jagged rocks often prevents users from reaching the ocean; here rocks are carved to give users more accessibility.

Revised Post #3

The Getty center museum houses wonderful art and is home to impressive architecture, everywhere you look you seem to see something new and different. For a first time visitor, I felt overwhelmed and confused. This all changed as soon as the landscape architecture tour started, the beginning of the tour focused on the small gardens located within the museum courtyard. The second phase focused on a piece of living work of art located within the central garden; it was created by artist Robert Irwin. Robert Irwin completed this sculpture in 1997. This work of art has many different elements that make it unique and extraordinary. The central garden was designed to challenge all of your five senses. Upon entering the central garden the first thing you notice is all the different types of plants, while also hearing the sound of running water hitting rocks and flowing down stream. As you make your way down to the central azalea maze, you are forced to walk down a path that is in a zigzag form. This path makes you move in a way that creates rhythm. Its pattern consists of spaces that are empty to over designed areas. For example, one side of the path can be filled with trees and running water, while on the other side it can be just plain grass and open space. While moving down the path you can also smell curtain plants, from the simple pine smell to a strong garlic smell. Another way the plants challenge your senses is by them having different textures, many of the plants had a unique texture ranging from soft to rough. Just by the few examples given all of the five senses were taken into consideration when creating this living sculpture. This garden is clearly a good example of a site specific design but also is an example of practical design.

Original Post #3

The Getty center museum has wonderful art and impressive architecture, everywhere you look you seem to see something new and different. For a first time visitor and visiting all by myself, I felt overwhelmed and confused. This all changed as soon as the landscape architecture tour started, the beginning of the tour focused on the small gardens located within the museum courtyard. The most impressive piece of landscape architecture was the living work of art located within the central garden; it was created by artist Robert Irwin. Robert Irwin completed this sculpture in 1997; it has many different elements that make it a unique and extraordinary work of art. The central garden was designed to challenge all of your five senses. Upon entering the central garden the first thing you notice is all the different types of plants, while also hearing the sound of running water hitting rocks and flowing down stream. As you make your way down to the central azalea maze, you are forced to walk down a path that is in a zigzag form. This path make you move in a way that creates a rhythm or pattern. Its pattern moves from empty to over designed areas. For example, one side of the path can be filled with trees and running water, while on the other side it can be just plain grass and open space. While moving down the path you can smell curtain plants, from the simple pine smell to the strong garlic smell. Many of the smells reminded me of food which made me want to get some pizza or something from the museum café. Another way the plants challenge your senses is by them having different textures, many of the plants had a unique texture ranging from soft to rough. Begging to be touched and caressed. Just by the few examples given all of the five senses were taken into consideration when creating this living sculpture. This garden is clearly a good example of a site specific design but also it is an example of good design.

Post #4

The Getty center has impressive works of art within its walls. The one piece of art work often overlooked is the piece entitled “The Central Garden” with was created by Robert Irwin. It is located outdoors in the middle of the Getty center; it’s considered a living work of art because it was created to be enjoyed as a live painting. Before entering the central garden the first thing you noticed is the path that weaves in a zigzag pattern, as you begin your descent towards the bottom of the garden you begin to notice important details that add to your experience. Water hitting stones is what fills your ears as you enter the first phase of the garden. Walking from left to right a pattern emerges; your eyes begin to be overwhelmed by tress and other plants. Then out of nowhere it all stops and vast open empty space is seen. This pattern is consistent until you reach the end of the zigzag path. Once it ends a choice is given, choose a path to the left or to the right; ultimately both paths are the same and end up in the maze of azalea. Before reaching the azalea maze the sound of water hitting rocks diminishes, the water empties into a small pond. The path that encircles the pond is filled with plants that have unique scents, ranging from strong garlic smells to sweet soft flower scents. Once the end is nearing, an astonishing view is presented of the zigzag pattern path along with the textures and shapes of the plants adjacent to the path. The overall experience is concluded with the last and final choice which is how you will exit the garden. The most common way to exit is to experience the zigzag path once again, this time the sound of water is low and gets intense as you find the exit. Having experienced the live work of art of Robert Irwin one is left inspired with what care went into creating a multi-sensory experience.

Location-Patio located in front of building 5. The word square is shown on the layout of the ground.

The Picture Below shows the walls the trees create to enforce an enclosed cube/square.

[caption id="attachment_576" align="alignnone" width="192"]View- looking up Location- the corner of building 5 View- looking up Location- the corner of building 5[/caption]