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Here is my idea which is a blend of all of the good ideas we’ve had so far. This is the simplest approach I can think of that will be extremely effective.

The model base would be made of MDF board (same material Ernie used for his LA 103 model) at 2′ 6″ wide for a seamless and sturdy sleeve for the laser cut “ribs” (cardboard or basswood) to slide in. This will create a unity to the piece and make the river feel as if it has a base holding it up.

The model will be suspended from the ceiling and held up by these pieces of wood that I can get very easily from the home depot. They are used to hold lumber off the ground so the forks of a forklift can fit under, they already have the grooves cut out to hold hanging line in place.

Depending on the amount of detail we intend to have on the top of the model itself, I don’t think we need to create any kind of step for people to see higher parts of the river, by standing adjacent and back a little, one will still be able to view these parts of the river.

Also, disregard diagonal lines running across model base.

billys mock up 2billys mock up_wire detailbillys mock up_view of topbillys mock up_look down

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My reaction to Roger Revelle Centennial Symposium: Science for the Future and the Future of Science is that it is great that he and Ashok Khosla are on board with these scientific techniques for a sustainable world. Roger has pointed out that rich people and countries like the U.S. for example take more than they need. This sets the example for all of the smaller and poorer countries out there to practice wasteful strategies; Ashok reveals this as the Copy-Cat Method. It is very sad that poorer countries are so burnt out of working hard and not having what they deserve, the only way these countries find pride in themselves is to spawn big families with lots of children; this in turn creates a larger problem for the world when population is increasing at such a drastic number. By the time 2030 comes along we are going to need more space to withhold the population. I feel as if we shall continue to educate these smaller countries in non-wasteful spending techniques and regeneration techniques, by visiting these countries and participating in a teaching program, we can make a change. These very poor countries need to learn sustainable techniques to support their land and regenerate the biological characteristics of their ecology as priority. As Ashok said, there are different ways to do things. To learn, to care, and to teach: maybe if the U.S. gets smarter and starts to practice ways of ecology regeneration, we can set an example for others to follow.

While reading the “Changing the Dreams: How Civilizations Reinvent Themselves”, I’ve grasped a better understanding to science as a integral system. One thing I enjoyed was the assumptions that “better tools have led to three firmament-shaking shifts”. 1.) Everything is made of energy, not matter. This makes sense to me because of the fact that energy is embedded as a foundational element before you matter is formed. 2.) Everything is connected, not separable, and casualty is complex, not a simple, singular or sequential. In my opinion this statement is interesting because I am a strong believer in karma, everything we do has a greater purpose and the ethics of our actions is returned to us in an indirect way, everything is connected through complexity. 3.) Complex interdependent systems are more orderly than imagined. This to me is a view of scale, when you zoom out on the way entire systems are running; it is fairly simple to understand when put into a different perspective. All of these are important views to understand the transitional period of time we are going through.

 “We will never solve our problems using the same kind of thinking that caused them in the first place.”

-Albert Einstein

“Successful transitions require a conservative progressive alliance aimed at preserving past societal lessons while working past the limits and distortions of the current age.”

-Chapter 1 of The New Science of Sustainability – “Changing the Dreams: How Civilizations Reinvent Themselves”

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Transportation; the action we challenge ourselves to everyday could be an extremely less chaotic experience if we rode our bicycles. CicLAvia was an especially interesting experience in Los Angeles, a city we all know of that’s filled with a million cars on the roads at any given time of the day. While riding through the city streets I felt proud to have participated in an event which had such a strong involvement towards the alternative-transportation movement.

Riding through the streets with no cars in site and sky scrapers in every direction was quite the experience, and if such an action like this took place every day, the world would be a happier place. There’s something about exercising while outdoors that allows the human mind to be relieved of worries.

During the ride to Venice Beach we came upon some pretty interesting forms of bicycles which people had chosen to equip themselves with, everything from three bike-frames welded together to make a eight foot tall bike one had to climb up on, to a six person dining room table on wheels where they all pedaled together to suspend the table forward.

Not too far along the journey my butt began to become sore from the constant riding. It was then that I didn’t know how I was going to last a 32 mile round trip.

Venice Beach was culturally interesting as always, more than most beach cities in Southern California. We ate lunch and between seeing the drummer-on-a-bucket and the man-painted-gold, I was enjoying my time at the beach. Seeing all the cool art work on the walls and the paintings for-sale put me in an artsy mood and I began to paint in my mind.

As the afternoon began to fade and our phones began to die, we headed back with no time to waste in order to catch our train at 5 o’clock PM. After what seemed a never- ending bike ride to Union Station, the train attendant wouldn’t let us on. The tickets we had bought were for Metrolink only, not for Amtrak. If only the attendant had informed us that we could buy the tickets on our phone-app while the train departed we would have been just fine, but by the time I left to buy tickets the train had started moving. The poor guy must not have had a smart phone.  Luckily we didn’t have to wait till 7 o’clock PM for the next train and were able to get on the Pomona train where helpful friends could give us a lift back home.

With a little more sunscreen on my back, a more comfortable seat and a smart phone equipped attendant the day could of went a bit smoother, but in memory the day was fun and I’m glad to have participated in the alternative transportation movement. I was reminded as to what kind of preparation and energy riding a bicycle across the city takes but also the way it makes you feel. Being cooped up in a vehicle EVERYWHERE we go is unhealthy and we as individuals ought to enjoy some aerobics every now and then. Especially in this country, -I’m just saying. The smog in the air we breathe and the ozone accumulation in our atmosphere are not so good for us either so why not take some extra time and do something good for you and others- ride a bike!

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This completed residence built from 1989-1991 is located in Dallas, Texas and was designed by AIA Gold Medal winner Steven Holl. This is the Stretto House.  The name ‘stretto’ reveals that this piece of architecture has musical qualities. The house is based off of the stretto form in music where one musical phrase overlaps another and draws the listener in tune. This idea was created after Holl had visited the site and heard the constant murmur of water from the concrete dams in the nearby stream illuminating a consistent tempo in the sound of nature. Visually these dams resembled an overlapping stretto in a piece of music. Holl’s concept of the Stretto House was built off of existing site conditions and from previous knowledge in the music discipline.

The Stretto House was designed for an art collector who trusted anything Holl desired to propose. With these circumstances Steven created a house designed entirely off of a piece of music written by Hungarian composer Béla Bartók in 1936.

There are four divisions of space within the construction of this residence (two of which are seen here in the picture above-the walls on the left and right). These four main sections represent the overlapping percussions (heavy) which consist of heavy orthogonal masonry and the roof represents the string instruments (light) which is consisted of light curvilinear metal.

Together the residence becomes complete where the design pulls one through the independent spaces (indoor and outdoor) like the overlapping stretto in a song-pulling the listener onward to the next musical phrase with delicate consistency. It is the joy of experiencing architecture with spatial and light sequences, textures, smells, and sounds.

In reflection, this residence reveals much more than a resemblance of a musical form. The artistic concept also reveals a convergence of landscape and architecture where nature and infrastructure are fused. When one sits by the ponds in the outdoor space they are relaxed by the constant buzz of running water or one is affected by the natural elements of the surrounding environment. Combining of these properties attempts to inform the occupier of the intended function of each spatial sequence. The Stretto House is a blended grouping of nature, infrastructure, and art all fixed together to serve the specific function of a home for an art collector.

Villas (Rome)

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Composing Landscapes By: Chr. Hochstenbach van der Heiden/ B. van den Heuvel (1650)

This drawing reveals the density but yet separation of the villas in Rome and how they are proportioned within this land.

The Gohner garden (Morcote)

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Visionary Gardens: Modern Landscapes

By: Ernst Cramer, 1940’s

This high quality designed landscape reveals very strong construction techniques and great herbaceous plant coverage on a difficult slope.

Analysis of Landscape Fragments and Urban Patterns in an American Metropolis (New York)

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Composing Landscapes

By: C. Wouters, M.T. Pouderoijen (2005)

New York’s urban pattern is a very dense grid and there is very minimal space utilized for parks or open spaces.

IMG_2567Blog #4

I woke up, got ready, and departed into the heavy morning dew of Oceanside. I was reminded of last year when I’d be going to work in a timely fashion. Time was always important, and will always be.  Today I had the privilege to tour the famous Salk institute in La Jolla.

The morning went quite pleasant with a mimosa and eggs Benedict to start off my day. Having extra time to enjoy a breakfast is special to me. A bright shining sun reminded me that mid-day was approaching and the others will be gathering at the Salk Institute to spend some time visiting the campus and discussing the building and design process.

Time is a valuable property that must be considered when designing an outdoor space, building, or anything that will be exposed to the elements. Wind, water, and sunlight all contribute to the aging of materials and the appearance they give off. Aged materials are a direct representation of time. We can utilize the appearance of such materials like a clock, which tells how long a building has been standing, how often it is maintained, or when the last time these materials had been replaced.

The time we spent at the Salk Institute, which was roughly two or three hours, made me realize that I can measure the amount of time that the institute has been here by examining the teak wood panels around the windows. This campus was built with the intent to have no maintenance and to embrace time. The ocean and salty air with its destructive properties aged the wood so clearly which expressed the fact that time had its effect on this building.

After our time at the Salk Institute we left to grab some lunch. My experience there had me reflecting on the fact that time is everything, it’s everywhere and its reflection can be very apparent. Time is what we slave to everyday, it’s what we consider when working on designs or drawings, and without it our lives would be completely unstructured and most likely disastrous. It’s best to be aware time; however the key is to not let it overcome you. Manage your time well and time will be on your side.

Blog #3 Revised

With one faint cloud above me, the Salk Institute unraveled much more than a view to the ocean. This biological study center was designed for minimal maintenance so it will last long for many generations- just like the scientific research conducted here could create a cure for the generations to come. The light, wind, and water elements were enclosed in the grand courtyard all around this axial and metaphorical stream. This stream in the center of the courtyard was flowing from one end to the other and it represented the collaboration of minds all working together. Without enough water the stream wouldn’t be flowing and without the brilliant minds at the Salk Institute cures to the planets common diseases wouldn’t develop.

The design draws your eye to the end of the stream where your view is then framed on the horizon of the pacific. As I was guided through the space, I was informed on the process in which this architecturally magnificent campus was built. Volcanic ash was mixed into the concrete walls and the matching travertine marble floor gave off a warm emotion. These walls were constructed horizontally on the ground and were tilted up vertical to create the six-story towers on either side of the stream. A close examination revealed an unfinished look where I saw the structural steel in the concrete walls and the wood grain imprint from the set-forms on the volcanic surface. In my opinion the color of materials chosen here demonstrates strength and unity. I see strength because the colors are similar to that of solid granite or sedimentary parent material, and I see unity because of the similar neutrality in the colors ties everything together to make a great design.

Louis Kahn’s Salk Institute was very inspirational to me and I hope one day I can reflect some of his design process in my future endeavors.

Blog #3 Original:

With one faint cloud above me, the royal blue sky blended together as one with the sparkling blue ocean. The Salk institute created a prestigious emotion within me. The light, wind, and water elements were enclosed in the grand courtyard all around this axial and metaphorical stream. This stream in the center of the courtyard was flowing from one end to the other and it represented the collaboration of minds all working together. Without enough water the stream wouldn’t be flowing and without the brilliant minds at the Salk Institute cures to the planets common diseases wouldn’t develop. The design layout draws your eye to the end of the stream where your view is framed to the pacific. Knowing that cutting edge research is conducted behind these ashy walls, it made me feel as if I was part of something important. As I walked through the space, I was educated on the process in which this architecturally magnificent campus was built. Volcanic ash was mixed into the concrete walls and the matching travertine marble floor gave off a warm emotion. Although as I stood in the majestic courtyard the wind blew through as if I was in a tunnel and left me quite cold. These walls were constructed horizontally on the ground and were tilted up vertical to create the six-story towers on either side of me. A view close up revealed an unfinished look where I saw the structural steel in the concrete walls and the wood grain imprint from the set-forms on the volcanic surface. The Salk Institute unraveled more than a view to the ocean. This biological study center was designed for minimal maintenance so it will last long for many generations, just like the scientific research conducted here could create a cure for the generations to come. The stream will keep flowing and the Salk Institute will continue to amaze. One day I will design like Louis Kahn.