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Julia Baek

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For my LA experience I went to the Hammer museum to watch a special performance, called “Forest of the Floor”. It was originally choreographed by Trisha Brown. The performance is only a part of Brown’s works called the Equipment Pieces possibly because of the equipment that is used: ropes and steel pipes.

When I first entered the museum I was confused. I didn’t know where the performance was. No one came out to announce the start and it began, out in the open center of the museum, where people casually hung out. I knew nothing about what I was watching at the time, because I wanted to interpret the piece in my own way.

At first, I was lost. I didn’t understand what was happening except two “dancers” dangling and climbing poles and clothes, wearing and removing clothes, and silence. There was no music to give me a slight hint, it was just the audience and the dancers.

As I continued watching I was thinking, why the performance was staged outside in a somewhat public space. I saw what surrounded the space and constantly asked myself why, why here? There were trees, wooden outdoor furniture, people, cars in motion, etc. It felt as if I was in a noisy jungle. Even the structure used for the performance reminded me of a jungle or forest like display, because the clothes were hanging and dangling like tree branches, a canopy. I also sensed the use of gravity. Seeing the dancers loosen their bodies and dangle from the steel pole, sort of like monkeys trying new ways to move about and relax in a chosen space.

I might have been looking for the most complex theme to the performance, but as I was discussing with someone else I realized I was unaware of the simplest meaning. Trisha Brown choreographed a performance that portrays a person’s simplest daily task to a more complex level of action.

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source: http://www.arcspace.com/features/diller–scofidio–renfro/blur-building/

Diller & Scofifio – The Blur Building

2002

 

Liz Diller is a member of a firm called, Diller, Scofidio & Renfro. They were the first architecture firm to receive a MacArthur “genius” grant. Diller & Scofidio worked on the Blur Building in yverdon-les-bains, Switzerland. Their practice focuses on design, performance, and the use of electronic media with architectural and cultural theory. They create designs to form a relationship with nature and how architecture is limitless.

The Blur Building is the centerpiece of the 6th Swiss National Exhibition completed in 2002. When looking from afar, the structure is visible, while up close, all that you’ll see is a mist. Interestingly, the structure looks like a cloud from afar. The building sprays innumerable amounts of tiny drops of lake water by the use of a high-pressure spraying technology. Even if it rains, the misty structure is visible, because computers adjust to the different climatic conditions of weather and breeze. When entering, a long ramp leads into a large open air platform, located in the center of the fog. The only thing you’ll hear is the noise of water spraying nozzles. Drops of water is sprayed to create a mist effect also known as blur, therefore the name of the structure is the Blur Building.

Not only is the structure unique from other architectural structures, their interactive media, the raincoat create a social relationship with the structure. The enhanced raincoat, ‘brain coats’ is a wearable, wireless technology. The brain coat reacts to others and affected by positive and negative affinity between visitors through color changes and sound.

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Geometric Hot Springs, 2005

by German del sol

Geometric paths and huts reveal different views of the natural forest environment that is surrounding the space.

source: http://www.archdaily.com/4190/geometric-hot-springs-german-del-sol/

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The Red Ribbon, Tanghe River Park,2006

by Turenscape

The bold and solid line provides a well-defined path and multiple views of a forest like park.

source:  http://www.contemporist.com/2008/03/27/red-ribbon-in-tanghe-river-park/

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“Ashar Macha”  (Platform of Hope), 2010

by Khondaker Hasibul Kabir

A platform full of green vegetation emitting an environment of natural peace and beauty, temporarily takes you away from the slum to a space full of life and tranquility.

source: http://laforhumanity.org/ashar-macha-platform-of-hope/

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#4

From my experience on Tijuana River National Estuarine I learned that being in a real scene is a whole lot different than looking at an image of a scene. I felt intimidated not only by the giant fence, built to keep me in or out, but the police as well because of their constant presence. Overall, the trip to the estuarine was a great one time experience.

In order to enter the beach, I had to follow a winding concrete and dirt path. The only way I was able to tell whether we reached the beach was by the changing texture of the ground. Sands started to crunch under me feet as I got closer and the sound of wildly blowing wind and waves crashed around me. I felt relaxed and the only thing I wanted to do was to sit and calmly look at the horizon while the flocks of birds were flying and chasing waves.

As the class moved towards the fence, I noticed the tall height and length of the fence. The long narrow lines were as tall as a 2 or 3 story building. It looked impossible to climb and the fence formed a line, a form of division, between Mexico and the U.S. I felt like I was being caged in and constantly being watched or spied on, but by just facing away from the fence and towards the ocean, a sensation of being free and open rushed over me. It’s amazing how looking at two different direction could give two very different sensations.

Tijuana River National Estuarine is place where one can sense different views at the same time. Not only do I experience the physical form of the land change drastically I felt the change in environment and atmosphere. It was interesting how there were buildings on the Mexico side of the fence and on the U,S, side was just the hill, ocean, and sand.

#3

Tijuana river national estuarine is an area of physical and cultural separation of The U.S. and Mexico. This was one of the sites that impacted me the most. At first the site meant nothing until I met the final path, the border of U.S., that I experienced the strength and restriction a space can hold.

On my arrival to Tijuana River National Estuarine, the beach was nowhere in sight and all around me  were rocky dirt roads and parking lot, trees, shrubs, grass, metal fence, etc. The area was open and flat and everyone was waiting for the trip to the estuarine to begin. Surprisingly, a worker there warned us about contaminated water/ mud that flowed down from Tijuana, explaining how toxic some areas were and what harms might come to us if we were not careful.

Every careful step was leading me closer to the beach. It was really interesting how the dirt road or path drastically changed into sand in just a few steps. As soon as the view of the ocean was visible to my eyes, I couldn’t look away. The sky was clear, the waves were strong, the cool blowing winds, and the soft sand added texture to the scene. Although it wasn’t comfortable to walk across and litters were everywhere, just the view of the ocean was enjoyable.

The walk continued on until the fence, the barrier, was in front of me and everyone. An attempt to touch the fence was impossible since the policemen drove down just to warn us not to. It scared me a bit and I even felt the policemen watch from above, on a hilltop, watching our every move. Lots of pictures were taken and lots of topics were discussed and at the end we walked back.

On my path back to the parking lot I noticed a river that was flowing right through the path to the parking lot. I am assuming the channel of water flowed down from Tijuana, Mexico to San Diego, U.S. It’s just amazing how nature has no boundary while people always bind and divide ourselves with rules, laws, morals, culture, religion, etc.

#3

Tijuana river national estuarine is an area of physical and cultural separation of The U.S. and Mexico by political and physical force. This was one of sites that impacted me the most. The landscape emitted an atmosphere of oppression, power, fear, and irony. At first the site meant nothing until I met the final path, the end of U.S., that I experienced the strength that a space can hold.

On my arrival to Tijuana River National Estuarine, the beach was nowhere in sight and all around me were rocky dirt roads and parking lot, trees, shrubs, grass, metal fence, etc. The area was open and flat and everyone was waiting for the trip to the estuarine to begin. Surprisingly, a worker there warned us about contaminated water/ mud that flowed down from Tijuana, making my expectation to lessen.

Every step was leading me closer to the beach. It was really interesting how the dirt road or path drastically changed into sand in just a few steps. As soon as the view of the ocean was visible to my eyes, I couldn’t look away. The sky was clear, the waves were strong, the cool blowing winds, and the soft sand added texture to the scene.

The walk continued on until the fence, the barrier, was in front of me and everyone. An attempt to touch the fence was impossible since the policemen drove down just to warn us not to. It scared me a bit and I even felt the policemen watch from above, on a hilltop, watching our every move. Lots of pictures were taken and lots of topics were discussed and at the end we walked back.

On my path back to the parking lot I noticed a river that was flowing right through the path. I am assuming the channel of water flowed down from Tijuana, Mexico to San Diego, U.S. It’s just amazing how mature has no boundary.

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This river channel was taken in Tijuana River National Estuarine. The river channel reveals lines and curves. In the pictures the dirt or mud becomes less evident as the images enlarge and plants become more condensed.

It’s interesting how the river flows freely from Tijuana, Mexico to San Diego, U.S. and humans can’t even make a single physical contact in between Tijuana and San Diego beach.